Landscape winner: World Achitecture Festival 2013

Australia Garden. Photo John Gollings

Landscape winner of the World Architecture Festival 2013 is The Australian Garden by Taylor Cullity Lethlean + Paul Thompson.

The Australian Garden, Photo John Gollings

The Australian Garden, Photo John Gollings

This new botanic garden in Cranbourne Victoria, is in a former sand quarry and allows visitors to follow a metaphorical journey of water through the Australian landscape, from the desert to the coastal fringe. This integrated landscape brings together horticulture, architecture, ecology, and art to create the largest botanic garden devoted to Australian flora. The garden showcases some 170,000 plants across 1700 species, all adapted to its challenging site condition, using the Australian landscape as its inspiration to create a sequence of powerful sculptural and artistic landscape experiences that recognize its diversity, breadth of scale and wonderful contrasts. Host to a vast collection of plants for scientific, educationa, and conservation purposes, the Australian Garden plays a vital role in helping scientists and the public understand the history, present day uses and what the future may hold for plants in natural and urban environments, creating a unique Australian identity.

The Australian Garden. Photo John Gollings

The Australian Garden. Photo John Gollings

The judges said, ‘This garden brilliantly summarises the great variety of Australian flora as well as the large part of the country which is arid desert. Like a botanic garden, it is a collection of difference, but with a strong unifying set of journeys through the various landscapes. This landscape stood out with its originality and strong evocation of Australian identity without having to use any signs or words – just the beautiful flora of Australia’s countryside.’

The Australian Garden. Photo John Gollings

The Australian Garden. Photo John Gollings

See more about The Australian Garden on the World Buildings Directory.

The judges highly commended two projects.  One was Qunli Stormwater Park in China by Turenscape. The judges praised it for ‘meeting one of the key ecological needs of our time – water runoff – and turning it into an ecopark’. See the project here.

ustralian Garden. Photo John Gollings

The Australian Garden. Photo John Gollings

The second highly commended project was the upgrade of  Prince Alfred Park+Pool in Australia by City of Sydney c/o Neeson Murcutt Architects. The judges said, ‘This was a clever reinvention of a 19thCentury park which faces a myriad of urban uses’. See the project here.